Hardiness Zones

Please note: Gender is a social construct and for centuries it’s held onto a binary (boys & girls) system. HGHW does not believe in the binary; the deep history of systemic sexism and transphobia has uniquely harmed self-identifying girls and gender expansive folks. This is who we work with. As consistently learning intersectional feminists, we welcome and celebrate folks across all identities, abilities, races, ethnicities, religions, economic statuses and sexual orientations.

What is a Hardiness Zone?

The back of a packet of seeds tells you how much light, water and spacing a plant needs to grow and thrive. This information is based on a USDA standard, called hardiness zones, which considers the environmental conditions that plants need to thrive in certain locations. Ignoring the instructions and putting the seeds in unhealthy soil without sunlight and water could be the difference between

and

Big difference, right? But you wouldn’t blame the seed for its inability to grow in that environment. Yet, that’s what our society does to girls every day: plants them in misogynistic soil, pits them against each other, demands they look a certain way, and forces them to shove down their roots. And when a girl doesn’t bloom, we ask what’s wrong with her?

At Hardy G*rls Healthy Wom*n, we believe it’s the environment that’s in need of attention. G*rls aren’t the problem, they’re part of the solution.

HGHW creates hardiness zones centered on:

Curiosity, Thinking Critically, Building Coalition, and Challenging the Status Quo

Ten Ways to Create Hardiness Zones

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LISTEN TO GIRLS and GENDER EXPANSIVE YOUTH

Allowing g*rls to tell you what they need gives them ownership of their story. Listening means not assuming you know all the answers or that your way is the right way. Pay close attention to what g*rls are saying and ask them to elaborate on their thoughts and feelings.

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REMIND YOURSELF THERE IS NO TYPICAL G*RL

In spite of what the media shows us every day, g*rls and women come in all shapes and sizes, from diverse family backgrounds and social situations, and have different needs and interests. Value these differences and encourage g*rls to draw on their experiences to teach one another.

 

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TEACH G*RLS (and all youth!) TO BE CRITICAL CONSUMERS OF MEDIA

Teach g*rls to question the narrow images (girls as sexy, as divas, or boy-crazy shoppers) they see on TV, in the movies, online, in toy stores, the mall, and in magazines. Offer them examples of real people who are not constrained by stereotypes.

 

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STOP WORRYING ABOUT YOUR LOOKS

G*rls learn about wom*nhood by watching and listening to the wom*n in their lives. When you make negative comments about your body, you’re teaching g*rls that women judge themselves and other women on their looks. G*rls will learn to love their bodies if they see wom*n doing the same.

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DO YOUR OWN WORK

Before “helping” g*rls, wom*n first need to work on our own stuff. We can’t help girls practice healthy conflict resolution, teach them to stand up to bullies, or expect them to create healthy relationships if we can’t do these things ourselves.

 

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USE TEACHABLE MOMENTS

If your daughter comes home upset about an injustice she experienced or witnessed, use that situation to brainstorm ways she can fix things. Again, listen first. Don’t overreact or jump in to fix the problem for her. Think and plan together.

 

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ASSUME SOLIDARITY BETWEEN G*RLS

Today, the media is rife with catty, backstabbing g*rls. As a result, it’s getting harder for them to trust one another. Affirm girls’ relational strengths and their potential for coalition and collective action. Provide stories about and create opportunities to see and experience such g*rl power in action.

 

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ENGAGE G*RLS’ ANGER & HELP CHANNEL IT PRODUCTIVELY

Contrary to messages g*rls are getting from everywhere, anger should not be silenced. Help them identify anger, know how it feels, and how to stay clear and centered in their disagreements. Offer constructive ways to express strong feelings – ie. speaking up directly and respectfully, writing letters, or organizing a rally.

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ENCOURAGE G*RLS TO CREATE SOCIAL CHANGE

One of the most powerful things you can help g*rls realize is their own ability to create change. Support them in their efforts to make change in their schools and communities. Teach them to draw up a petition, show them how to write a letter to the editor, help them think about other ways to use their voice to speak out. Show them their opinions matter.

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OFFER SAFE PLACES TO PRACTICE & GROW

We all make mistakes. G*rls are likely to learn from their mistakes if they have a safe, non-judgmental place to practice, try on new roles, and find their own voices.